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In pictures: fed up farming in the snow
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In pictures: fed up farming in the snow

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Farmers sent us their pics showing us how they dealt with the day.
Farmers sent us their pics showing us how they dealt with the day.

There was a collective national intake of breath, as people opened their curtains this morning to see snow-covered fields, and feared a return visit from the beast from the east.

But the latest forecast from Met Éireann shows that the worst of the snow seems to have passed, though temperatures are still expected to be cold and reach -3°C tonight.

However, farmers still had to cope with a day of cold, wet weather and, after Storm Emma, many were feeling frustrated that they had been hit by a second cold spell.

The east of the country seems to have been the hardest hit, and Patrick Dunne sent on some of his pictures to the Irish Farmers Journal Snapchat.

A number of people had to deal with lambing and calving and Mag Lawlor sent on a picture of a lamb that had to be brought in from the cold in Co Carlow.

Frozen pipes and trying to get water to animals remained a huge issue on many farms. A farmer in Kilkenny had to let his cattle down to a local river to access water.

It can be a dark time for many farmers with the pressures of calving and lambing and a delayed spring. But, as James Robinson points out, coping with the seasons is part and parcel of farming and spring will come!

Read more

Buckle up for the ‘son of the beast’

How to deal with frozen pipes

Feeding in the freezing cold and frost

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