Upcycle a hall table in granny-chic style with stencilling and distressing
In a new DIY series, Joanne Condon of Kyle Lane shares some simple up-cycling projects to give old objects around the home a new lease of life.
Creating the stencil detail using the template. Credit: Carol Dunne.

Upcycling a hall table in “granny-chic” style

LEVEL: Intermediate

This project uses popular upcycling techniques, such as stencilling and distressing, to give an old hall table a new look.

Materials needed

  • • Medium or fine-grain sandpaper.
  • • A cloth.
  • • Water-based primer (I used Farrow & Ball interior wood primer and undercoat).
  • • Water-based paint (I used Farrow & Ball estate eggshell, stiffkey blue 281, arsenic 214, Nancy’s blushes 278, blue ground 210 and clunch 2009).
  • • Paintbrush.
  • • Bristly brush for stencilling.
  • • Blade.
  • • Marker.
  • • Masking tape.
  • Method

  • In a circular motion, sand the table with medium/fine-grain sandpaper.
  • Wipe off any dust from sanding with a dry cloth.
  • Prime the table using a water-based primer and undercoat.
  • Paint in a colour of your choice with two to three coats of paint, allowing them to dry between each coat.
  • Print the full-sized stencil template. Print out the templates and trace out each section onto a piece of heavy card or acetate.
  • With a sharp blade, cut out each colour on a separate acetate.
  • Apply Template 1 with masking tape to the area of your table you want to place the flowers on (this is to make sure the stencil won’t move while you are painting).
  • Start with the largest colour first (Template 1) and work your way to the smallest.
  • With the bristly brush, dab the paint into the stencil until it’s covered in an even coat and leave it to dry fully.
  • Remove the stencil and tape down Template 2 to the table and repeat steps seven and nine with colour.
  • Repeat steps seven and nine with the third stencil.
  • With a small brush, correct any mistakes and sharpen up the stencil design.
  • When your table is fully dry, achieve the distressed look by sanding corners and sharp edges to give the table a bit of character. Be careful not to get too “sandpaper happy”. Less is more.