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Increased water demand puts water and septic tanks under pressure
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Increased water demand puts water and septic tanks under pressure

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In this special Focus, we look at the installation of a new water well, mineral injection systems, septic tank inspections and a low-cost sewage treatment system for existing septic tanks.
In this special Focus, we look at the installation of a new water well, mineral injection systems, septic tank inspections and a low-cost sewage treatment system for existing septic tanks.

Since 2010, dairy cow numbers have been on the rise. This means demand for water is on the increase too.

With the increased demand, existing water systems and water wells are coming under pressure and may require upgrading.

Upgrading can be a considerable investment but when you consider the fact water is crucial for milk and beef production, the cost is put into perspective.

Water well

In this Focus, we look at the installation of a water well. The installation process of these wells has come a long way.

Fifty years ago, it could take three weeks to hit water. Today, with the help of modern machinery a new well can be drilled, lined and fitted with a pump in just three days.

The EPA has useful guidelines on protecting wells from surface water pollution.

These guidelines should be seriously considered and implemented if the water well is used for human consumption. Remember to always site a well away from septic tanks, silage pits and animal accommodation. The top of the well should be capped to protect it from wildlife.

Mineral injection systems are an ideal way for dairy farmers to improve the accuracy when feeding minerals to cows.

In this Focus, we find out why a Co Louth farmer finds this system useful on his dairy farm.

Septic tanks

It’s four years since the crackdown on defective septic tanks and sewage treatment systems, and there has been very little movement in terms of upgrades.

As Paul Mooney reports, to make best use of resources county councils are targeting inspections where watercourses near septic tanks are most at risk of pollution.

Approximately 1,000 domestic septic tanks have been inspected every year since the new regime was put in place.

Each year, about half these systems fail inspections. It is only when a system fails that a rural dweller may be eligible for grant aid to upgrade their system.

Therefore, rural dwellers with old or defective septic tanks usually have to go to their own expense to upgrade systems.

Sean Mullooly features a Co Westmeath company that claim to have an alternative for upgrading poorly functioning existing systems.

Read more

In pictures: preventing contamination in a new well

Watch: getting minerals to cows through the water system

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