Burglary prevention: lock up and light up your house and farmyard
The average burglary last year cost householders €600, while farm thefts cost more than €4,000.

Almost half of all residential burglaries in winter time happen between 5pm and 11pm, according to An Garda Siochana.

In almost one in five cases, burglars enter the house through an unsecured door or window.

Last year, the typical value stolen per incident in the last 12 months was €600, with jewellery and cash the most common objects stolen from homes.

There were over 160 cases where car keys were “fished” through the letterbox in the past year.

Garda advice, whether you are at home or going out, is to remember to turn on some lights, use timer switches and lock all doors and windows.

You should also use an alarm, store keys away from windows and letterboxes and don’t store large amounts of cash or jewellery in the house.

Farm thefts

Agricultural crime costs victims an average of €4,300, according to a WIT survey.

Diesel is the item most often stolen from farms, followed by electrical tools, hand tools and trailers.

However, one secure shed on a farm could prevent a lot of farm thefts, according to one crime prevention officer.

Read more

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Burglar claims medical damages from injuries sustained in alleged burglary

Two-thirds of farmers have been victims of agri crime

Another fall in Global Dairy Trade prices
The latest Global Dairy Trade shows a drop in the price of butter but rise in whole milk powder price.

The latest Global Dairy Trade shows a drop in the price of butter but a rise in the whole milk powder price.

The event for this week concluded with the GDT Price Index down 1.7%

The price of butter dipped 8.1% to €4,237/t, cheddar 3.3% to €3,076.38/t, skim milk powder increased 0.8% to €1,675.92/t and milk powder is up 1.5% to €2,543.40/t.

In addition, rennet casein is down 9.5%, to €3,937/t.

Simplicity at the core of Wicklow Better Farm
Brian Doran farms grassland and tillage in Co Wicklow, with a large crowd attending his farm walk.

A crowd of over 200 people attended the first of two Teagasc/ Irish Farmers Journal BETTER Farm Beef Challenge walks taking place on Brian Doran's farm just outside Carnew in Co Wicklow.

Brian is farming 43ha of grassland and 41ha of tillage. The grassland area is split into two blocks. The 32ha main block is situated around the yard, with the remaining 11ha five miles away.

Simplicity is at the core of Brian’s system, with 50 suckler cows and calves running in one block and a 55 steers and heifers running in another. All progeny are sold as steer and heifer beef.

The walk of Brian's farm includes five main stand focusing on areas and BETTER farm challenges such as herd health, breeding, grassland management, meeting the markets and dealing with the current drought and fodder problems.

The farm is no different to many farms across the country and is feeding both silage and concentrates in an effort to prolong the rotation and save what grass covers are left.

Each of the stands generated a good discussion between the audience and the speakers which included members of the Irish Farmers Journal livestock team, the BETTER farm management team and local Teagasc B&T advisors.

Here are just some of the main quotes from the day:

"Going forward, Brian's farm is capable of producing a gross margin of €1210/ha, a rise of almost €400/ha in five years” – Tommy Cox, Teagasc BETTER farm programme adviser.

“Reducing the calving spread has definitely reduced the labour on the farm. I like the black Limousin cows, lots of milk and easy calved” – Brian Doran, host BETTER farmer.

“Grazing infrastructure, soil fertility, grazing management and reseeding are the most important points of grassland management, in that order” – Hugh Mahon, Teagasc B&T adviser.

“If you are to take only one thing from today, it is that lime is the single most critical factor in soil fertility and in growing more grass” – Bob Sheriff, Teagasc B&T adviser.

“There definitely isn’t enough knowledge around the pricing grid system among farmers” – Denis Brennan, Slaney Foods

“Quality assurance is the bare minimum requirement from all our suooer market customers. It’s an absolute must for us when we are selling our beef.” – Denis Brennan, Slaney Foods

Another walk is scheduled for 5pm this evening on Brian Doran’s farm. On Thursday, the Teagasc/ Irish Farmers Journal BETTER Farm Beef challenge will head west to Nigel O’Kane's farm in Co Galway for another two BETTER Farm beef challenge walks.

Read more

BETTER Farm: tapping into potential in Galway

Beef top tips: Calculating fodder deficits