Sign in to your account
Forgot / Reset Password? Click here
Not registered with Farmers Journal? Register now to read 5 Member articles for FREE
Or

To redeem your unique loyalty code from the print edition click HERE
Just one final step...
You must confirm your email address by clicking on the link we’ve sent to your email address.
You are only one short step away from reading...
Poultry confinement due to bird flu is under 'constant review' by Department
Register below to read FIVE Member articles
for free per month.
Or to redeem your unique loyalty code
from the print edition click HERE
Only takes a second!
Yes, I agree to receiving communications by email from the Irish Farmers Journal in relation to my membership, including editorial content and new marketing products and services from the Irish Farmers Journal.
Already registered with Farmers Journal? Sign in
By registering an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.
By registering an account with us you will also be subscribed to our email newsletter list. You can unsubscribe anytime.

Poultry confinement due to bird flu is under 'constant review' by Department

By on
Bird flu has become more of a threat to Irish poultry farmers in recent weeks.
Bird flu has become more of a threat to Irish poultry farmers in recent weeks.

The possibility of introducing mandatory confinement of poultry and captive birds is being kept under constant review, according to the Department of Agriculture.

This comes after the Department confirmed the first case of bird flu in Ireland in 2018 earlier this week.

Discussions are ongoing with industry stakeholders and with authorities on both sides of the border.

Regulations

Following the prolonged outbreak of avian influenza in 2016/2017, the European Commission undertook a review of regulations regarding the marketing standards for eggs.

The main consequence of this review was an amendment which said that the existing derogation under which eggs from hens without access to open air runs, as a result of veterinary restrictions, can be marketed as free range is extended from 12 to 16 weeks. This amendment came into effect on 25 November 2017.

The amendment also clarifies that the derogation applies at flock level, that is the commencement of the 16-week period begins on the date on which the flock is placed in the laying house.

Clarified

The Commission has also clarified that in the event of hens' access to open air runs being restricted for more than the 16-week derogation period now permitted, eggs cannot be marketed as free range.

This will require an amendment to the producer code and the indication of the farming method on the packs.

Read more

New bird flu text alert service in NI

White-tailed eagle found with bird flu 'had not left Ireland'

Related tags
Related Stories
Dariy Master milk tank 4500 litres Automatic washerDirect expansion Twin...
With Cummins engine in PMO 550 genuine hours ...
Triticale, Linseed, Mustard premixed together in 22kg bags....
Low Cost Rainwater Harvesting System.The only system that collects 100% of r...
Create a wildflower meadow like this in 8 to 10 weeks. Attracts bees, butterflie...