The eco-friendly burger eating into greenhouse gas emissions
Every bite of a newly launched Swedish burger fights climate change.

Family-owned Swedish restaurant chain MAX Burgers has developed the first burger that goes beyond the international standard for carbon neutrality. It launched the burger this month at the Sustainable Brands conference in Vancouver and, according to its calculations, will achieve negative emissions for every sandwich sold from 14 June.

The process to create the greenhouse gas-busting burger started by measuring the product's emissions. The manufacturer says it traces the burger from farm to fork, calculating the emissions and waste generated along the way.

Planting trees

At least 110% of these emissions are captured by planting more trees, which mitigates the environmental impact of food production. Since 2008, the business has offset its emissions by planting 1.5m trees in Africa.

“Just going carbon-neutral is not enough anymore," said MAX Burgers chief executive Richard Bergfors "To meet the 2°C climate goal set out in the Paris Agreement, the world needs to work harder at cutting emissions and start the work of clearing greenhouse gases that have already been emitted into the atmosphere.”

The company started climate compensation 10 years ago and claims to be one of Sweden’s greenest brands.

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Nearly 300 agricultural science students hit top Leaving Cert marks
Nearly 8,000 students sat agricultural science in the Leaving Cert this year, with a third of students at higher level achieving 70% or greater.

Of the 6,543 students who sat higher-level agricultural science, 295 (4.5%) have achieved the highest possible grade of one, which has replaced an A1. Since 2017, Leaving Certificate students are graded from one to eight, with one equalling 90% to 100%, two equalling 80% to 90% and so on.

Results

In total, 57,149 students sat the Leaving Certificate, down 2.4% on the year before. Of this, 7,780 students sat agricultural science with nearly 80% of students opting to sit the higher level paper.

A grade of three was the most common result in the higher-level exam, with nearly 19% of candidates achieving this result. Over a third of students received a grade three or greater.

A grade of six was the most common at ordinary level, with 28% of students receiving this mark. It was closely followed by a grade five at 24%.

Appeals

The State Examinations Commission (SEC) has said that this year’s results are broadly in line with those obtained in 2017. They have reminded all candidates that detailed information about viewing their scripts and appealing their results can be found in the 2018 candidate information booklet.

A helpline will be operating from early on 15 August to provide information and advice to students and parents. The helpline number operated by the National Parents’ Council is 1800 265 165

The farmer’s daily wrap: UK short on fodder too and calls for import scheme
Read all about the top five farming stories and check out the weather outlook for Wednesday 14 August.

Weather forecast

Tonight will be cloudy and misty, with rain and drizzle extending gradually to most areas, according to Met Éireann. It will be mild and humid, with hill and coastal fog.

Tomorrow, Wednesday, will be mostly cloudy in Munster and Leinster, with scattered outbreaks of rain and drizzle. Drier conditions will develop in much of Connacht and Ulster, with a few bright spells for a time. Outbreaks of showery rain will develop in the west and northwest later. Maximum temperatures will range from 17°C to 22°C.

In the news

  • UK breeders say that fodder shortages are also a major concern for them.
  • Fianna Fáil has called for the a fodder import subsidy to be up and running immediately.
  • The first shipment of Northern Irish beef has landed in the Philippines.
  • Kerry has set the price for its forward milk price scheme.
  • Calls have been made for signs warning motorists to watch out for cyclists to be placed on rural roads.
  • Coming up this Wednesday

  • See the latest Tullamore Farm update.