AMR and hairy brassica among research projects receiving €11m
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has unveiled the list of research projects to be funded after its 2017 funding call, several of which could have direct effects for farming.

Of the €11.2m allocated by the EPA to scientists, the largest award of €650,000 went to a research project into antimicrobial resistance (AMR) led by Dr Dearbháile Morris of NUI Galway.

The growing resistance of bugs to drugs in livestock and in humans is seen as one of the world's greatest emerging health challenges. The discharge of resistant organisms such as bacteria and agents such as antibiotics into the environment is believed to be contributing to the problem.

“This four-year research project will generate national-level data on the key sources, hot spots and drivers of antimicrobial resistance in the environment from various sectors, and brings together a team of world-renowned experts in the areas of human health, animal health, agriculture, the environment, geographical information systems, risk assessment, high throughput sequencing technologies and metagenomics,” said Dr Morris.

Impacts of agriculture on water

Other projects receiving significant EPA funding include just under €500,000 for work led by Mary Ryan of Teagasc to explore how research and knowledge exchange can mitigate the impacts of agriculture on water.

Meanwhile, €450,000 is allocated for research led by Frank Wellmer of Trinity College into breeding brassica plants that grow more hair on their stems, which has been shown in other species to increase resistance to pests and reduce spraying requirements.

Read more

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Putting animal health top of the agenda in 2018

Weekly weather: welcome rain in the forecast
Rainfall will remain below average in parts of the east and south-east, but elsewhere values more likely to be above normal, according to Met Éireann.

Rain is forecast at various stages throughout the week and temperatures are set to remain in the 20’s across the country.

Monday

Met Éireann are forecasting a dry start for the east and south-east on Monday with patchy rain elsewhere producing a few heavy bursts locally. It will dry up in the northwest and patchy rain will move south-eastwards later in the day.

Tuesday

Tuesday is forecast to be a bright and fresh day with some sunny spells and just an isolated shower. Temperatures will reach highs of 16 to 22 degrees.

Wednesday

It will be mainly dry in eastern areas with some sunny spells on Wednesday. In western counties, rain will develop along the coast in the afternoon and will gradually push inland. The rain in the west will become heavy and will then extend eastwards across the country overnight. Highest temperatures 18 to 23 degrees are forecast.

Thursday

On Thursday, further outbreaks of rain will develop during the morning. A clearance will open in the afternoon with just an isolated shower after this.

Friday

Friday is forecast to be a much brighter and fresher day. There will be good sunshine during the morning, but showers will break out in the afternoon.

Farming forecast

Rain

Overall rainfall is expected to remain below average over the coming seven days in parts of the east and south-east, but elsewhere values more likely to be above normal.

Temperature

Temperatures this coming week are expected to be around normal along Atlantic coastal areas. Elsewhere, temperatures are expected to be a degree above average in most areas perhaps up to 2 degrees in the north-east.

Sunshine

There will likely be more cloud around this week and so sunshine amounts will likely remain below normal.

Drying Conditions

There is currently an orange forest fire warning in operation. Drying conditions will be moderate but will reduce poor at times particularly Monday in outbreaks of rain and again along Atlantic coastal counties Wednesday.

Spraying

Current indications suggest generally good opportunities outside of rain Monday and away from Atlantic coasts Wednesday.

Field Conditions

Soil moisture deficits are very high, ranging from around 30 to 60 mm in Ulster and Connacht, with values elsewhere exceeding 75mm. Little change is expected in the coming week apart from some slight relief in the northwest of the country.

Read more

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Five steps to address winter feed deficits

Drought advice: Irish and New Zealand experience

This week in photos: milking and the harvest continues
Our top photos from the last week include farming in Limerick, Tipperary and Wexford.

This week's front cover: milking in Co Limerick

Eoin Carroll from Ballyvolane, Co Limerick milking cows on the farm of John McNamara in Gormanstown, Co Limrick. Eoin is currently completing the work experience element of his Leaving Cert agricultural sciene project on John's farm. He is working part time on the farm and gaining experience in areas including grassland management, herd health and milking. \ Philip Doyle

Loading cattle in Co Limerick

Paddy Leahy from Kilmallock, Co Limerick transferring his Angus cattle to a trailer, having sold them to Foyle Meats in Donegal. Paddy says its crazy that he has to sell to a factory in Donegal but they are giving him the best price at the moment. Paddy farms Angus, Hereford and continentals. For the last few weeks he has fed them silage and 8kg of meal a day. He says it is a relief to get rid of them due to the drought conditions and the additional costs that that has brought. \ Philip Doyle

My farming week in Co Tipperary

Michael Condon from Newcastle, Co Tipperary delivers zero-grazed grass from Jim O'Leary's farm for feeding. Michael farms with his father and uncle in south Tipperary. The mixed farm is mainly in corn but also rears calves from neighbouring farms. \ Donal O'Leary

Harvesting in Co Wexford

Lester Rothwell harvesting Infinity winter barley in Lacken, Co Wexford. The crop was sown in the first week of October. Lester harvested a separate field of Infinity barley the previous day and got a yield of 3.3t/acre, but was confident that this crop will perform better. \ Philip Doyle

Harvesting in Co Dublin

The Fitzgerald family harvesting in Newpark, north Co Dublin. Cousins James and John are cutting Tower winter barley, along with James' sons Finn and Jack. The crop's moisture is 18.5% with a bushel weight of 67KPH. \ Philip Doyle

Read more

This week in photos: New Ross and Newport Marts

Around the country in pictures

This week in photos: Loughrea Mart and winter barley harvesting