Meet the young stars of the Irish Farmers Journal
Five stars in the Irish Farmers Journal describe what their typical nine to five looks like in the company.

Katriona Kinsella

From: Gorey, Co Wexford

College: Waterford IT Criminal Justice Studies Level 8, 2012-2015. Kilmuckridge WWETB Level 5 and 6 Certificate in Agriculture (Green Cert), 2015-2017.

Job title: social media and online content executive.

What did you do before the Irish Farmers Journal?

Before I worked in the Irish Farmers Journal, I was working as a legal secretary in a solicitor’s office, assisting two solicitors with conveyancing and criminal law matters.

When did you start in the Irish Farmers Journal?

September 2018.

What is your typical nine to five?

Typically, no two days are the same. My job involves taking content from the paper and putting it out across social media throughout the week, working on social media campaigns and coordinating events that people are attending to produce social media coverage, and interact with our readers and followers across social media on a daily basis.

Do you enjoy the work?

Yes, I thoroughly enjoy the work. I get to work alongside some of the most influential people in the agri-food industry and am involved with some great projects such as the Women & Agriculture Conference, Dairy Day and the Agri Careers Expo, to name a few.

What is the best thing about working in the Irish Farmers Journal?

The best thing about working in the Irish Farmers Journal is the opportunities that are offered to employees.

What would you change about your job?

I would move the Irish Farm Centre to Wexford.

Katriona Kinsella at the Women & Agriculture Conference 2018 in the Europe Hotel in Killarney, Co Kerry. \ Philip Doyle

Emily Crowley

From: Kenmare, Co Kerry

College: BA in Journalism, Dublin City University

Job title: sub-editor

What did you do before the Irish Farmers Journal?

My final college year finished up in May 2017 and I was due to complete a work placement as part of my degree. I managed to secure my work placement with the Irish Farmers Journal. Up until this point, my only journalistic experience was writing for a local paper at home as well as the college newspaper in DCU, both of which were unpaid positions, so I was working part-time in my parents’ garage, as well as a bar which helped tide me over until I started here.

When did you start in the Irish Farmers Journal?

July 2017.

What is your typical nine to five?

I suppose unlike most jobs there isn’t a specific schedule we stick to but we do have a routine of sorts. I come in at 9am and I will check to see what stories have come in for us to lay out. I’ll open an InDesign file, place the ads and set out to design the article. The page is then proofed and sent.

On Wednesdays and Thursdays, my work is a bit different because I work the web shifts. On Wednesday, I start at 11am and usually spend most of the day putting the articles from the paper online. This also involves creating bar charts and infographics.

We then have to make sure the article works aesthetically online, so we add in pictures, pull quotes and break up big chunks of text. We preview all the articles on our own computer before scheduling them to appear online at 10pm on Wednesday.

Do you enjoy the work?

Yes. I didn’t expect to end up working in the production side of journalism so I probably never really gave it a chance when looking at career options, but as soon as I started working here I enjoyed it from the get-go. There’s great satisfaction in seeing a spread or a page you worked on in the paper or magazine and helping the writer to illustrate his/her point.

What is the best thing about working in theIrish Farmers Journal?

The people who work here. We have a very diverse team of staff across the floor. Everyone is extremely friendly, welcoming and inclusive so it was very easy coming in here as a new member of staff – not knowing anyone – and being able to make friends quickly.

What would you change about your job?

I suppose the one thing I really miss is actually writing. When you’re a sub-editor you spend your day reading other people’s articles, most of which are really interesting, and it makes you want to get back into it yourself.

The way our schedule works on the production team wouldn’t make it feasible for me to start writing, but a bit of better time management on my own part might make it work.

Emily Crowley (right).

Anne O’Donoghue

From: Limerick, (current home of Liam McCarthy FYI)

College: BA in journalism and new media, University of Limerick

Job title: Journalist – Irish Country Living

What did you do before the Irish Farmers Journal?

After finishing college, I was tipping away at a few freelance journalism bits in print and radio in both Limerick and Cork. It was a good experience, but I jumped at the chance to work in the Irish Farmers Journal, having said I wanted to write for Irish Country Living from second year in college.

When did you start in the Irish Farmers Journal?

July 2017.

What is your typical nine to five?

I wouldn’t say I have a typical nine to five at all. It sounds clichéd, but really, every day is different. My job tends to be a mix of being on the road interviewing people and back in the office writing up those pieces. The combination suits me down to the ground.

Do you enjoy the work?

The fact that it’s very varied means I really like what I do. Also, the job is fast-paced, so you’ll never be bored. Life is too short to spend half your time miserable. I could never see myself clocking in nine to five in an office – I’d get claustrophobic!

What is the best thing about working in the Irish Farmers Journal?

It’s 100% the people you meet, and not the celebrities nor industry leaders. Part of my job is to look after the entertainment section, so I would see a few famous faces from time to time. But, it is the ordinary farm families you get to speak with and telling their stories that is gan dabht the high point for me.

What would you change about your job?

Nothing. It’s the type of role where the sky is the limit; you just need to motivate yourself to do whatever it is that you want to do.

Anne O'Donoghue.

Shane Finnegan

From: Cavan

College: BSc (Hons) in Sustainable Agriculture in Dundalk IT and a Masters (MAgrSc) in Innovation Support UCD

Job title: digital advertising account manager

What did you do before the Irish Farmers Journal?

I studied a BAg in Dundalk in conjunction with Ballyhaise. After this, I completed a two-year Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Masters in innovation support in UCD.

When did you start in the Irish Farmers Journal?

I started as Toplink sales executive in November 2014.

What is your typical nine to five?

My role is very customer-focused, and so it varies each day. The job involves meeting with clients around Ireland and the UK, and showcasing how the Irish Farmers Journal can help promote their company, brand or product to an online agricultural audience. I only started my current role in January. Previously, I worked as part of a sales team for livestock clients, and I worked as part of a team in the Irish Farmers Journal responsible for Dairy Day 2018 last November, which was a huge success.

Do you enjoy the work?

I do. It can be challenging but I enjoy that.

What is the best thing about working in the Irish Farmers Journal?

Being given the opportunity to play a prominent role in a number of key projects and events within the company, such as two Agri Careers Expos, Dairy Day and the Land Report, is great.

What would you change about your job?

A new coffee machine in the office would be a great addition!

Shane Finnegan (middle).