Weekly podcast: Creed, farmers' 2019 expectations and California drought
In this week's podcast, we interview Minister Creed, hear from farmers across sectors, update you on new Revenue rules for your employees' wages and travel to California.

 

Click here to download this week's podcast.

News correspondent Odile Evans sat down with Minister for Agriculture Michael Creed before Christmas to discuss the big-ticket items heading into the new year.

News correspondent Barry Cassidy speaks to several IFA representatives about what they see as the biggest challenges facing the beef, dairy, sheep, tillage and pig sectors.

With PAYE reporting methods changed from 1 January, news correspondent Barry Cassidy heard from Vincent Kenrick of Revenue about what the changes mean for farmers.

California is battling drought. Odile Evans speaks to the administrator of the California Farm Bureau Federation Richard Matteis about its availability and new groundwater legislation introduced in the state.

Missed the previous episodes of the podcast? Catch up here!

Pig prices are below the cost of production – IFA pig chair
IFA pig chair Tom Hogan has said that price increases from the pig factories are not coming quick enough.

The pig price is around €1.40c/kg to €1.46c/kg since it increased two weeks ago, but for most pig farmers, the increase in price is not coming quick enough, IFA pig chair Tom Hogan has said.

He told the Irish Farmers Journal on Friday evening that the current prices are below the cost of production.

“With feed costs at the moment, we would want to be getting €1.60c/kg. Feed costs haven’t come down as they usually do. The compounders should be pulling back on price.

Another price rise

“We got a price rise two weeks ago and the indications are that we could get another price wise, maybe as early as next week.

“There is a positive outlook going forward, but for most people these increases are not coming quick enough,” he said.

The IFA has said that there has been a slight decrease in the weekly pig kill and increased demand, which is helping to put more competition into the market place.

Read more

More small pigs as litter sizes increase

Leanne Kiernan: the goal-den girl

Farmer Writes: farmers selling pigs for cashflow reasons

Watch: new Agri Aware campaign to air in cinemas and on TV
The ‘Many Hats, One CAP’ advert is set to air on television and in cinemas in the coming weeks, with the campaign highlighting how important investment in agriculture is to the wider Irish economy.

This week, Agri Aware launched its new 'Many Hats, One CAP' TV and cinema advert.

Produced by Traction Marketing, the advert is part of a wider campaign which aims to promote and showcase how the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) affects everyday life in Ireland, whether that is subsidies paid to a farmer directly or the countless indirect knock-ons that keep rural Ireland alive.

The launch took place at Movies Dundrum, Dublin, on Thursday evening, where both the full and short versions of the advert where premiered for the first time on screen.

Rural landscape

The ad itself follows a day in the life of a number of characters who make up the rural landscape in Ireland.

From clips of rural entrepreneur and chef Edward Hayden cooking up a storm in his Graiguenamanagh cookery school, to farmer Kevin Moran up before dawn in Galway to milk his dairy herd, it gives viewers a glimpse into the role the agri-food industry plays.

Agriculture is a huge economic multiplier, which keeps rural Ireland alive

At the premiere, there was a panel of guest speakers which included Agri Aware chair Alan Jagoe and three of the stars in the ad; Hayden, Moran and Teagasc researcher Dr Dayle Johnston.

Hosted by Marty Morrissey, the panel reiterated the point that agriculture is a huge economic multiplier, which keeps rural Ireland alive, and the CAP is central to that.

Alan Jagoe spoke of the huge work, time and spend going behind the campaign.

“It costs money to put it out there, but consumers and society need to know where their money is going and who they are supporting.

"There needs to be an understanding and respect for the production costs and efforts that go into food production,” he stressed.

2016 FBD young farmer of the year Kevin Moran made the point that CAP itself “is not just one thing – a subsidy for a farmer - it is much more than that; it’s an investment in food security, an investment in rural economies and this investment is invaluable to rural Ireland”.

'Many Hats, One CAP' is a 12-month public information campaign that will go live across TV, radio, cinema, social media and print over the coming weeks.

Read more

Agri Aware, the CAP and Micheál

'Farmers must tell their story' – new Agri Aware chair

Farmers to lodge appeals over Castleblayney Mart next week
Around 40 of an estimated 100 farmers owed money by a collapsed Co Monaghan auctioneering firm have decided to pursue legal action against the Property Services Regulatory Authority.

Farmers left unpaid by the liquidation of EP Nugent Ltd, the company operating Castleblayney Mart, have decided to launch legal action against the Property Services Regulatory Authority (PSRA).

At a meeting on Thursday, attendees heard that one case against the PSRA failed, but won when it went to appeal.

Claim

Solicitor Paul McCormack told the Irish Farmers Journal that they have agreed to put “in a claim under the property services regulation Act 2011".

"Section 78 part three allows us to bring a claim. One case went forward to the Property Services Regulation Authority and was refused but went through to the property services appeal board and won.”

He says that the basis for the claim is that EP Nugent Ltd was trading “dishonestly” by not having a license.

“There’s 40 individual cases,” McCormack said, adding that the average claim is approximately €1,000.

“Nugent would like to see the farmers paid. There’s no guarantee it will happen. Claims had to be lodged within 12 months of the people finding out there was a problem. The liquidation was 9 April 2018 so we are up tight against the wire.”

McCormack advised that anyone who wants to make a claim should get in touch with his office at Thomas Street, Castleblayney, Co Monaghan, or the IFA.

Read more

Unpaid farmers seek legal advice on mart regulator's 'duty of care'

Property Services Regulatory Authority finally learns to use its teeth

Fishermen's case may cover marts debt to farmers